collectorandco:

woven obi / detail

collectorandco:

woven obi / detail

virtual-artifacts:

Detail of Japanese Kogin, a type of embroidery technique
Japanese Folk Art Museum, Tokyo,
Meiji Period, 19th Century.

virtual-artifacts:

Detail of Japanese Kogin, a type of embroidery technique

Japanese Folk Art Museum, Tokyo,

Meiji Period, 19th Century.

A textile of the Asuka era (592-710), Japan

A textile of the Asuka era (592-710), Japan

(Source: pinterest.com)

coquidv:

Shibori.  Early 20th century, Japan

coquidv:

Shibori.  Early 20th century, Japan

haruenishikawa:

Jimbaori (samurai battlefield vest) Edo period, 17th century Hand applied feathers, silk, and fabric H: 31-1/2 x W: 28-1/3 in. (80 x 72 cm) Leighton Longhi Inc. Oriental Fine Art

This vest is adorned with over 1,000 pheasant feathers from species indigenous to Japan, including the Green Pheasant, and features a bird’s-eye design on its back. 

haruenishikawa:

Jimbaori (samurai battlefield vest)
Edo period, 17th century
Hand applied feathers, silk, and fabric
H: 31-1/2 x W: 28-1/3 in. (80 x 72 cm)
Leighton Longhi Inc. Oriental Fine Art

This vest is adorned with over 1,000 pheasant feathers from species indigenous to Japan, including the Green Pheasant, and features a bird’s-eye design on its back. 

virtual-artifacts:

Japanese ( Ainu) kimono. About late 19th century

virtual-artifacts:

Japanese ( Ainu) kimono. About late 19th century

Sarasa Fukusa Precious Cloth .  India, for the Japanese Market
Cotton, gold: painted mordant and resist dye, gold gluing
First half 18th Century

Two exotic floral motif textile panels, each from the same cloth, joined back to back and preserved in a two sided glass frame that opens to permit the cloth to be used in Tea Ceremony rituals. The gold lacquered inscription on on the red box saying, “This heirloom property has been passed down in the Ikeda Family”. The Ikeda Family was a great Daimyo Family of the Edo period that ruled present Okayama Prefecture.  Thomas Murray

Sarasa Fukusa Precious Cloth .  India, for the Japanese Market

Cotton, gold: painted mordant and resist dye, gold gluing

First half 18th Century

Two exotic floral motif textile panels, each from the same cloth, joined back to back and preserved in a two sided glass frame that opens to permit the cloth to be used in Tea Ceremony rituals. The gold lacquered inscription on on the red box saying, “This heirloom property has been passed down in the Ikeda Family”. The Ikeda Family was a great Daimyo Family of the Edo period that ruled present Okayama Prefecture.  Thomas Murray

(Source: tmurrayarts.com)

Dragon Scroll Silk and silver thread embroidery, Japanese. 1868-1912.  Image via Pinterest

Dragon Scroll Silk and silver thread embroidery, Japanese. 1868-1912.  Image via Pinterest

oldbookillustrations:

Embroidered fukusa.
From Documents japonais (Japanese art documents), by Charles Gillot, Paris, 188?
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Embroidered fukusa.

From Documents japonais (Japanese art documents), by Charles Gillot, Paris, 188?

(Source: archive.org)

Embroidered silk panel.  19th century, Japan. Gift of Miss Laura Wheeler, 1937.  MET

Embroidered silk panel.  19th century, Japan. Gift of Miss Laura Wheeler, 1937.  MET

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Festival coat with dragon. Meiji period (1868–1912), Japan.
Cotton tabby, resist dyed and painted. 

Purchase, Seymour Fund and Citibank, N.A. Gift, 1986.  MET.  "A tiger accompanies the bold dragon on this jacket. The dragon appears in the clouds above waves, and the tiger gambols among sprigs of bamboo; both associations originated in China. The front of the jacket features pine, plum blossoms, and bamboo, plants that occur together in the Chinese tradition as the auspicious “three friends in winter” because they bloom or remain green even in the cold. It is thought that a similar jacket may have been worn for a festival or regional theatrical performance in the San’in district located on the Japan Sea side of the main Japanese island of Honshu.”  Image and yext via MET

Festival coat with dragon. Meiji period (1868–1912), Japan.

Cotton tabby, resist dyed and painted. 

Purchase, Seymour Fund and Citibank, N.A. Gift, 1986.  MET.  "A tiger accompanies the bold dragon on this jacket. The dragon appears in the clouds above waves, and the tiger gambols among sprigs of bamboo; both associations originated in China. The front of the jacket features pine, plum blossoms, and bamboo, plants that occur together in the Chinese tradition as the auspicious “three friends in winter” because they bloom or remain green even in the cold. It is thought that a similar jacket may have been worn for a festival or regional theatrical performance in the San’in district located on the Japan Sea side of the main Japanese island of Honshu.”  Image and yext via MET

(Source: metmuseum.org)

Noren with Design of Oak-Leaf Crest, Plovers, and Waves
Meiji period (1868–1912), Japan.  “ We can almost hear the cry of these plovers as they glide above the waves. Ubiquitous along Japan's shores and especially apparent in winter, plovers (chidori) inspired several poems that were included in early anthologies. In the Man'yōshū, Japan's first collection of classical poetry, the plover had melancholy associations. By the time of the tenth-century Kokinshū, the chirp of the plover was heard as chiyō “one thousand years”—giving it auspicious connotations of longevity and good fortune.  The bold design on this noren (shop curtain) is an example of a technique called tsutsugaki (literally, “tube drawing”). In this paste-resist dyeing process, the design is drawn with an applicator consisting of a paper cone with a metal tip that trails rice paste onto the cloth. Areas covered with rice paste resist the blue indigo dye, resulting in a white pattern on a blue ground.”  Image and text via MET

 

Noren with Design of Oak-Leaf Crest, Plovers, and Waves

Meiji period (1868–1912), Japan.  “ We can almost hear the cry of these plovers as they glide above the waves. Ubiquitous along Japan's shores and especially apparent in winter, plovers (chidori) inspired several poems that were included in early anthologies. In the Man'yōshū, Japan's first collection of classical poetry, the plover had melancholy associations. By the time of the tenth-century Kokinshū, the chirp of the plover was heard as chiyō “one thousand years”—giving it auspicious connotations of longevity and good fortune. 

The bold design on this noren (shop curtain) is an example of a technique called tsutsugaki (literally, “tube drawing”). In this paste-resist dyeing process, the design is drawn with an applicator consisting of a paper cone with a metal tip that trails rice paste onto the cloth. Areas covered with rice paste resist the blue indigo dye, resulting in a white pattern on a blue ground.”  Image and text via MET

 

(Source: metmuseum.org)

iseo58:

Jinbaori (Samurai vest).  About 18th century, Japan

iseo58:

Jinbaori (Samurai vest).  About 18th century, Japan

Silk kimono panel.  Bold peacock feathers in bright turquoise on a base of equally bright red antique, heavier crepe-like silk.  1930-1940, Japan.  Yorke Antique Textiles

Silk kimono panel.  Bold peacock feathers in bright turquoise on a base of equally bright red antique, heavier crepe-like silk.  1930-1940, Japan.  Yorke Antique Textiles

(Source: yorkeantiquetextiles.com)

Silk kimono panel.  1960-1980, Japan.  Yorke Antique Textiles

Silk kimono panel.  1960-1980, Japan.  Yorke Antique Textiles

(Source: yorkeantiquetextiles.com)